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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
.s. military objectives in iraq and afghanistan with the center for strategic international studies and we will talk about the debt ceiling debate and the 2012 campaign with the former chairman of the democratic national committee, tim kaine and fox news andtucker carlson. "washington♪ host: today is wednesday, july 13. we begin by talking about the continuing negotiations regarding the gatt talks happening on capitol hill -- devt talks happening on capitol hill. we will have coverage of that on c-span.org. the first 45 minutes, we want to talk about some of the items in the headlines this morning. "l.a. times," debt talks grow more desperate. senators at merger -- urgent three stage process. it would have a last choice option. for the first 45 minutes, republicans only. we want to get your thoughts on republican leadership handling the debt talks. the numbers are on the screen. if you are in the eastern and central time zone for the first. the second if you are in the mountain and pacific time zones. for the first 45 minutes, just republicans talking about the republican congressional
actxs reports on u.s. troops in southern afghanistan. then, representative thaddeus mccotter announces his candidacy for president. >> tune in to c-span this independent state. panelists discuss if the united states can remain united. >> at the political level, we are more divided. you look at partisan polarization at any point since the civil war and reconstruction. >> then, religion, bonds, and the death penalty. later, nixon white house insiders discuss his foreign policy. this monday on c-span. for the complete schedule, go to c-span.org. >> david axe was imbedded with the u.s. army in afghanistan. it is his fourth visit to the country. he spent time with the 4th airbourne, patrolling in remote areas and engaging the security situation. obama announced a plan to bring 10,000 troops home from afghanistan by the end of the year. >> it depends on where you are. my experience is in the east. i have a little experience in the south. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have st
.s. policy in afghanistan and iraq. we want to begin the segment by talking with the defense policy reporter with bloomberg news. she joins us by phone. she has traveled with defense and that i ton patte iraq. talk about what you heard the defense secretary do while he was overseas. guest: it was interesting to watch secretary panetta and compare how he handled the trip and his interaction with troops and with foreign leaders to secretary gates. he has fairly big shoes to f ill, according to people who were quite complementary. leon panetta also has a lot of familiarity with u.s. military forces. forces. with the commanders and foreign leaders that he is meeting with and going to be interacting with. with his experience as cia director for more than two years before taking this job and in other capacities, for example, a member of iraq study group that did the independent assessment in 2006 of the war in iraq. host: was specifically was the defense secretary trying to accomplish on this trip? guest: he wanted to go out and touch base with the troops themselves and make that connection. it is
the civil war in afghanistan. i do not understand why members of congress want to spend $10 billion a month in afghanistan when our people back home are struggling. i can assure you the american people do not understand it, either. in june, a poll was conducted by the pew research center where 56% of the american people polled said bring our troops home now. not later. mr. speaker, i brought back the picture of edy and stephanie. their father and lieutenant colonel palmer, died, and that continues to haunt me. and the way they died continues to haunt me. that's the reason i wanted to bring this picture down here again. they were given the task to train afghans to be policemen. the two were shot and murdered by one of the trainees. what really haunts me is the email sergeant baldwin sent to his wife the day before he was shot and killed. i quote the email, i don't trust them. i don't trust them. for anything. not for anything at all. why in the world do we continue to send our young men and women overseas to get theirselves blown up, shot, and murdered by people they are trying to train? the
, and taking into account significant gains made in u.s. operations and against al qaeda in afghanistan and pakistan over the past year, counterterrorism efforts in yemen must be a central focus of our national security strategy. that said, our -- closely in line with political, economic and developmental challenges as well. those challenges are those that the united states must work to address as part of a holistic approach to this challenge. first of all, just outlined three. three priorities. first, we need a better understanding of the political opposition and prospects for democratic reform. acting president, the vice president in yemen, as only a small power base in the opposition appears fractured between the so-called joint meeting parties, jmp. and other individuals such as the former commander of the first armored division and check out omar, leader of the powerful fellow. over the weekend elements of the opposition asked the formation of a shadow government to the composition and support, i should say though the -- for those the composition and support for the group remains u
and afghanistan to the relatives of the 2005 london transit bombings as well as the royal family. the editor has been arrested. david cameron has opened a public inquiry. for the first time in over a month, the yemen president spoke out. he's gone over eight operations. his complexion was darker, hands and arms covered with bandages. facial hair was gone. he made no mention of when he would return to yemen and welcomes power sharing as long as it is within the country's constitutional frame work. diplomats said there was a slim chance he would return. tell me what this means and your reaction to what you saw in terms of his appearance. >> it was bizarre. it's part of a larger power. look at yemen and egypt. what you see are prolonged stalemates and situation that is looked helpful. the middle east is in for a long, hot summer. a difficult winter and beyond. this is not going to be anything like a quick move to democracy and these countries. you can have large, ungoverned spaces where terrorists move in. it's a challenge for the united states. >> what is the largest threat to our national securit
and done, iraq and afghanistan will suck the treasury dry to the tune of at least $3.7 trillion. enough already. mr. chairman, the pentagon is like that teenager. you keep giving the kid the keys to the car and he keeps crashing it. it's time we cut him off. we must draw the line and we must draw it here. no more money for libya. no more continuance in libyan hostilities. i urge my colleagues, support this amendment. i yield back. the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise? >> i move to strike the last word. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. poe: the gentleman says we have gone to war in the name of humanity. in other words, the president's war in libya is so that we can preserve humanity in libya. in the history of peoples, as the gentleman from california has pointed out, in the histories of countries, it has always been the king, the dictator, the tyrant, the chief, the leader that has sent that particular country to war. so when our ancestors got together and they formed a new and perfect union, they decided it would not be the leader,
are helping insurgents, enemies of the united states in afghanistan and effectively helping to kill americans and other nato forces there. what are they saying about that? >> well, wolf, it doesn't make sense when you look ate from an american perspective. when i was in pakistan earlier this year, pakistani officials are very concerned about two things. they feel a threat from india. they're worried about the indians having influence in afghanistan. there are some elements within pakistan that use these insurgents in afghanistan as sort of a check on india's power there. they don't like this idea of this rival india having influence on the other side of the border. the other thing they worry about is going into the tribal regions, by doing so they kick up a hornet's nest and then those people start to make attacks in places where people really care. you can liken to a very rural part in alaska, there would be a difference between something happening there and something happening in the heart of times square manhattan. that's sort of the pakistani perspective on that, wolf. >> a juror in the c
want to get you caught up in another headline coming out of afghanistan. the president's brother, half- brother, shot dead by bodyguards. joining us on the phone is hei di with the associated press. what happened? guest: this man was a close associate of the president's brother. he was in ahmad wali karzai's house and shot him at least twice before he himself was gunned down. host: was it his own bodyguard? who was this person? caller: we are still gathering details on who this man was. it's clear he was a very close, personal friend. he does handle security for ahmad wali karzai. it sounds like he is a much higher level than your personal bodyguard would be. in theaallowed a gun home, which shows the trust between the two men. brother awas karzai's target? very powerful figure in southern afghanistan and a very controversial one. he's the head of the provincial council, which on its own would make him the man controlling the area. both because of his connections to the president and a lot of associations -- he made things happen in kandahar province, which is the real former stronghol
there, as little afghanistan's. so a year ago al-shabaab conducted the first attacks, actually outside of somalia. they killed 76 people, including one american in uganda. so there's a growing concern that al-shabaab leaders are striving to strike targets, not just beyond somalia now, but beyond africa. a european plot was recently uncovered. it was in the works and it was uncovered. so links between al-shabaab and al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, the most active of all of the al qaeda franchises, are becoming clearer and clearer to us in the united states. they are communicating more about operations. they are working together on training. they are working together on tactics. the bomb making capability that al qaeda has, the expertise that they have there is being combined with al-shabaab's recruits. and these recruits frequently have western passports. many of them have u.s. passports. this is quite a deadly combination. and that's why last month, then cia director panetta called al-shabaab's threat to the u.s. homeland in his words significant and on the rise. u.s. forces have be
have or do that wouldn't have to raise the debt ceiling. one is the iraq and afghanistan war, it's george bush's war. i think what we need to do is go after george bush, dick cheney, and donald rumsfeld and let them pay for their wars that they got us into. the second thing is that we need to stop sending our money overseas and start helping our own people. the third thing is that all of these senators and congressmen that are making making $170,000 a year and making these poor choices, if they would be making $40,000, $50,000 a year, every one of their dumb decisions that they make wouldn't only affect us but it would affect them. host: thank you for your call. next up is royal oak, michigan. this is eugene a republican. good morning. caller: yes. i am calling in regards -- i'm very disappointed in boehner. i was going to send him some money, but now i'm not. i gave allen west some money, and i'm getting disappointed in him for him caving. i can't understand why the mainstream press insists on sending the republicans -- saying the republicans are at fault all the time when they
panetta, the former head of the cia. he's saying on his first trip to afghanistan, his first public comments, really, saying that the defeat of al-qaeda is within reach and here is what he had to say on saturday. >> we're within reach of strategicically defeating al-qaeda. if we could be successful at going after them, i think we can really undermine their ability to do any kind of planning to be able to conduct any kind of attack on this country. but that's that. that's why i think it's within reach 'cause they're going to sake some more work? you bet it is, but i think it's within reach. >> mike: in the first couple of days, is that statement too bold, that statement? >> i like it, covets. >> ainsley: i do, too. >> dave: that was supported by congress and we like his congress and david petraeus echoed that and holds the promise of a strategic defeat of al-qaeda. he is he, too, is confident if we can get more kills, 20, we would crush. >> ainsley: 10 to 20. >> mike: al-qaeda is all over the world and not just in pakistan. >> dave: they believe the head of al-qaeda is in pakistan al
with afghanistan, and over the years the number has gone up steadily. in the first few years in the strikes of 2,042,007 they're just a handful and then we see it going up in 2010. the obama administration rising at a policy never fully publicly articulated. 118 strikes last year and 45 so far this year. the pakistanis said a couple of months ago that they wanted him stopped them stopped and they ordered the cia out in their base in pakistan were some of the strikes are being launched. by my reckoning there is than a dozen since then. so has this been done like the enlightened raid against the will of the pakistan government? put the whole thing in a different legal contextualization. we don't know that for sure but we know the americans are defensive about in last month for example john brennan tried to relay concerns he took to new targeting procedure and he said that in the past year there hasn't been a single collateral death because of the exceptional proficiency precision of the capabilities we have been able to develop. in other words because they have been checking much more carefully th
of the wars in the iraq and afghanistan, it's about taking care of those bush tax cuts, it's about taking care of the medicare prescription drug bill. all those costs. and to say we're going to forget about those and worry about the future when our kids are the ones that will suffer is irresponsible. so i don't think the president would want to act unilaterally, nor do i think congress has to force the president into acting unilaterally. we can get this done. this is a manufactured crisis because for seven different occasions under president bush, under 17 or 18 different occasions under president reagan republicans voted to lift the debt ceiling because they knew we would default on our debts for the first time in history. jenna: so let's say we're moving towards this deadline, and we actually are -- >> we are. jenna: august 2nd, right? you've seen so many different numbers and you mentioned so many different issues, and i don't mean to gloss over that in generalities, but there's so much involved in this decision about the debt ceiling and also about cutting spending overall. but where do yo
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)